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20121125
20121125
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
cheap that chemical manufacturers are attracted back to america. it's so cheap that russia is worried his hold on the eastern european economy is going to fail because we cannot supply them at natural gas in southern russia at the initial supply. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pus
that speech to the people of russia and china. >> all right. mar ma mary. joe. >> and he is squire, americans the year. miss dunham is celebrated for reinventing the romantic comedy with the h.b.o. program "girls" and chief justice roberts celebrating for reinventing taxing power for conservatives who endorse liberal priorities and i hope the chief justice is enjoying his new intellectual company. >> paul: all right, joe. bret. >> ron paul, thank you finely for retiring. there's been a question of ron paul, areat man of principle or somewhat strange character with often some might say bigoted views and recently come out talking about the virtues of succession, those of us who always thought ron paul was a crank and find ourselves confirmed. >> paul: remember, if you have your own hit or miss, send it to us at jer@foxnews.com and follow us on
the supply delivery business to russia, they left the gulf, those small number of advisors in saudi arabia and in iran stuck around for decades, and it's that role that really represented america's influence that stemmed from world war ii, the pro longed war in the gulf. >> host: professor, i think of the british when i think of the involvement in the middle east. when and how did they step back their involvement? >> guest: well, with regard to the gulf, the brits arrived in the 1800s. and it represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount
east, syria, north korea, china, and russia and so forth. i would imagine a considerably lower priority. eac n >> didew cuba policy wax and wae with each new administration? >> it did. the most fee roshes opposition was during the kennedy years. jack kennedy was really determined to cosomething about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. humiliated by castro at the bay of of pigs. was lyndon johnson came after kennedy, and his obsession was vietnam.pitously cuba. declined.r, subsequent presidents such as gerald ford, jimmy carter made serious efforts to acheech a, response with castro. quite the opposite what kennedy was doing.y comby has waxed and waned. it's been a different kind of priority over the fifty years e for ten or eleven american g presidents. >> onet theerer reverse side. it did they have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president. >> i continue think that -- don't think that castro had a ai directns demand the assassinatin de plotri against the american t president. mo but i do describe in the book -- some of the most startling infor
. >> he was born in russia when his father was with the russian military. >> by the early 1980s he had significant niche for himself in the structure. >> kim jong-il was a character of fun to a lot of people in the western world because he was short and had that boof fant style hair and wore elevator shoes but he was in truth a very brutal dictator. >> he has expensive taste in everything from alcohol to t cigarettes to expensive boats. >> it was reported he liked american culture. >> he loved american film. he supposedly had a library of many thousands of films. he once had a south korean actress, favorite south korean actress abducted. she was kidnapped from a beach in hong kong and taken to north korea and required to become basically his actress slave. >> they had kidnapping of people that's how they went about it with film and with migrate uncle. >> mick kim's own familiar licks combreernsed the cruelty of the north korean regime. >> migrate uncle was a lead engineer. >> grandmother's mother. >> my mom and others and my family told me about how during the korean war the north kore
from france, russia as well as switzerland are going to open yasser araf arafat's grave. this will have big certificate remonth niall character. there's a religious ceremony. a military ceremony. and the same is happening when he is laid to rest again. the whole thing they say is all going to happen in one day so it won't take very long. what the palestinian authority has left open is how long the actual investigation of the sample is going to take. all of the samples are separately going to be taken to rue sharks france and switzerland to the labs there to be analyzed and it's unclear how long this analysis is going to take. however, if it does come to light that yasser arafat was poisoned with a radioactive substance that will cause massive emotional reactions here and already the investigation is a very emotional one for the investigators and for the palestinians as the lead investigator said in his press conference. >> translator: the 27th of november will be one of the most difficult days of my life because of many personal, national and symbolic considerations. but i consider it a
to russia, libya. twenty-three countries. egypt and honduras and the philippines. the leaders of these countries must get that they are doing something wrong. >> they did it easier than in north america. the people who brought in the rule of law and property rights into the united states, the 18th and 19th century, you can't remember that. in the case of these guys, they see that they are poor relative to your wealth. it's easy for them to sycamore is the difference? they are constantly looking so they can recognize much faster. we did not realize the fact it you can determine that a piece of land went from there to year, you can also do it with a movie script. you can also do it with an idea, an invention. and certainly. all of a sudden we started seeing that people just the paper. on top of that, you build a stock market and all that leverage. get you into some kind of trouble, but without which you would not have gotten where you are today. john: property rights give us the power to prosper. thank you. we will be right back. ♪ ♪ [ale announcer ] they are a glowing examp
, that the united states had the responsibility to protect the independence of nations from communistic russia. this may south vietnam. now, kennedy had raised troop levels. i won't go into all the things that truman and eisenhower did, but right alone, we are very heavily involved in protect and south vietnam and johnston believed that these prior commitments committed him. he also is a strong cold war era. he is to comment on how the young people protesting simply didn't understand communism because they'd never grown up or had to fight world war ii. they didn't know what appeasement meant in munich, you know, chamberlain forth. the united states must keep its commitments. it was johnson's great misfortune when you either had to fish. kennedy didn't have to do it. >> host: you are referring of course to the nominal theory. >> guest: is a very good cold warrior, but i never bought the domino theory. because this has always made every disappeared histories that this is america thinking that you put up a solid wall. not just united front, the sheer method is just no opposition on these issues a
into germany to sustain the war effort while german soldiers in vast numbers were being sent to russia to die. the germans surrendered in the japanese were pushed back to their home islands, and the american to save human lives while the statute votes and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop those bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality illustrated by the report of dr. sheena. japan's top atomic scientist sent down to hear a shame of following day and had to report back to the emperor. he was asked, was this an atomic bomb? dan kim the line, how long until we can make money? is hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese it was surrender or die. became a temporary victory the principles of american exceptionalism worldw
on tuesday? forensic scientists from france, russia, and switzerland will exhume the body of the late palestinian leader. then what they're going to do is take samples and test it for poisoning. arafat will be then reburied that same day in religious and military ceremonies. rumors and speculation have continued ever since arafat died suddenly in 2004 at age 75 that he may have been poisoned. >>> a newspaper editor has quit his job over topless photos of catherine, the duchess of cambridge. meeblg o'kane resigned this weekend. in september the irish paper was one of several european papers that published pictures of the duchess sun bathing topless. the photos ignited a storm of controversy and sparked legal action by the british royal family. >>> if members of congress truly want to reach across the aisle, the place to start might be between each politician's ears. why the brain may be key to bipartisansh bipartisanship. >>> but, first, a question for all you political junkes watching this morning. what was the highest margin income tax rate in u.s. history? the highest. if you know t
i go to russia a lot. the russians that come to america like lieberman have driven the country to the right. there's a lot of work to be done there. working for a magazine that fought for the freedom of israel, pushed president truman. the care for israel, there are many jews in this country whose voices aren't being heard because apec is the right wing american voice, has not met a voice from j. street, a new group that endorsed congressman cohen. you need a sense of range of israeli voices which we are not hearing because of the nationalism and we have war. there are people like norm, people like -- >> he was here last week. >> he was here last week. they want a different kind of israel. >> i want to ask if the relevance actually is no longer the case in the new post era war after we take this break. >> okay. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i
. or the understanding and i'm sad about this, because i go to russia a lot, that the russian who is come to israel like lieberman have driven the country even further to the right. working at a mass zeen as i do that fought for the creation of the state of israel, pushed president truman who didn't want to the care for israel, there are many jews in this country whose voices aren't being heard. because apec remains the right wing likud voice. a new group j street which first endorsed congressman cohen. you need a sense of a range of israeli voices which we're not hearing now in israel because of nationalism. >> because people hunker down. >> there are people like norm shazeff who was here last week they want a different kind of israel and they're trying to fight for that moral quarter. >> no longer the case in the new post era after we take a break. and we got onesies. sometimes miracles get messy. so we use tide free. no perfumes or dyes for her delicate skin. brad. not it. not it. just kidding. that's our tide. what's yours? >>> there's a certain theory that i think popular in washington, d.c. foreig
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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